Graduate Student Seminar

February 23, 2024

10:00 a.m. ET

Doherty Hall 2210

Iron Nitride: a Non-Rare-Earth Containing Permanent Magnet

Niron Magnetics, Inc. is commercializing Iron Nitride, a high performance, completely rare earth free permanent magnet technology. Iron Nitride will act as an economical substitute for several grades of both sintered and bonded NdFeB magnets. Niron’s Iron Nitride technology is based on progress achieved by the University of Minnesota under work supported by the Department of Energy’s Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies ARPA-E REACT program. These magnets are based on the α”-Fe16N2 compound which has high saturation magnetization and a moderate magnetocrystalline anisotropy due to a tetragonal crystal structure. Iron Nitride is manufactured from low-cost, non-critical elemental components. The unique characteristics of Iron Nitride include a magnetic strength higher than most grades of NdFeB permanent magnets. Test data also indicates that iron nitride exhibits superior temperature stability when compared to NdFeB. Niron’s magnets are positioned to substitute for NdFeB in applications such as motors with high torque output.

02-23-Johnson.pngFrank Johnson - CTO, Niron Magnetics

Frank Johnson joined Niron Magnetics, Inc. in March 2018. Prior to Niron, he worked for 13 years at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, NY as a Materials Scientist in the Ceramics and Metallurgy Technologies organization. Dr. Johnson’s work has focused on developing magnetic materials used in power generation, distribution, and conversion technologies. He earned a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an M.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from M.I.T., and a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

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